Old 06-19-2017, 12:24 AM   #1
trevlyns
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Default Pro Studio Control Rooms...

Been watching a few videos and notice many don't conform to the 'logical' layout - speakers firing down the longer length; many speakers are up against the wall and no sight of acoustic treatment. So pardon the dumb question, is music not mixed in this environment as well? And how is this different from our home studios

Just askin'
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Old 06-19-2017, 03:35 AM   #2
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Some studios have treatment built in to the structure of the room. Some might have a carpet type material on the walls - combined with a 'second' wall - wall within a wall. And, yes, some have nothing at all. Many control rooms are far less than ideal - but, at the end of the day, it's about working in an environment that you're very used to - that you know well enough to make decisions in.
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Old 06-19-2017, 04:07 AM   #3
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Another aspect of this is that the bigger your room is, the easier it is to get a decent sound with less attention paid to the more esoteric end of room treatment.
And of course if the room is a vocals-only/small booth facility, the requirements are different to a general control room...
The list of variables is endless.
I mixed an album of songs in Wessex back in the day & it was like working in a corridor!
Another smaller studio I worked in near Oxford (Mill Stream - just remembered!)had the control room one story up exactly OVER the live room. You had to look through this sort of periscope on the floor to see the band.
The most unlikely control room I ever worked in was the original studio at Rockfield!
Utterly bizarre, as was the live room, but it worked rather well.
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Old 06-19-2017, 05:11 AM   #4
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Well, on PAPER one of the advantages of a professional studio is the quality of the build, the design of the room and the acoustics. In reality a great number of commercial rooms, even very well-known ones are just BAD in this respect - they're badly designed, badly laid-out, badly treated, the ergonomics are difficult, and it can take a lot of experience to mix well in them. Some, usually the ones with reputations as great mix rooms are extremely good, either by design or accident, and work very well. But of course it may be that a wonderful live room, and a great microphone collection are what sells a place. If regular clients are used to a 'bad' control room, the management may not be minded to upset the apple cart by making changes which may not be entirely predictable. Either way, there's a reason that 'mixers' tend to work only in their own space, and resist the idea of mixing in spaces they're not familiar with.

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Old 06-19-2017, 05:22 AM   #5
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One influential part is monitors themselves having room tweakability stuff like when placed near a wall - usually a hp shelving from 130-300 Hz or so.

So selection of monitors - spend some more and get tweakability.

You can even tweak monitor ports by stuffing with some socks or other stuff.

A port is there to increase low end usually - so putting some material in ports you can do it just at the end, or push this material in a bit - and you get less low end - and can make up for having them right up the wall.

So even adjusting how far inside you put material - you have a low end control.

I have my monitor placed on console beside display - so also get some resonance from that furniture - and up against a wall.

Adjusting ports with some foam fillers that came with monitors and it became really good.
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Old 06-19-2017, 05:43 AM   #6
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And of course no thread like this would be complete without mentioning the one-size-fits-all "pro" rooms from Eastlake/Westlake.

Tom Hidley's history makes fascinating reading if you are an audio geek....
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Old 06-19-2017, 05:46 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trevlyns View Post
no sight of acoustic treatment.
The best acoustic treatments are things you can't really see. The shape and size of a room are important, as is the construction of the walls.
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Old 06-19-2017, 05:47 AM   #8
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This Pensado episode teach a bit too:
http://www.pensadosplace.tv/studio-d...ert-carl-tatz/
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Old 06-19-2017, 07:00 AM   #9
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Wow! Such great advice

That's why I love this forum. - Thanks guys.
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Old 06-19-2017, 07:23 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ivansc View Post
Tom Hindley's history makes fascinating reading if you are an audio geek....
The height of Tom Hidley's design philosphy definitely was BOP Studios, at one stage the most expensive studio ever constructed: http://boprecordingstudios.co.za

Construction: https://youtube.com/watch?v=WThktJuWi9A

Sound on Sound Tour:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=ZjKVndZSZqE
https://youtube.com/watch?v=_BadrCUelg8

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Old 06-19-2017, 12:26 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trevlyns View Post
Been watching a few videos and notice many don't conform to the 'logical' layout - speakers firing down the longer length; many speakers are up against the wall and no sight of acoustic treatment. So pardon the dumb question, is music not mixed in this environment as well? And how is this different from our home studios

Just askin'
SBIR wise its acually better to have the speakers close to the wall as the offending freq will be higher up, meaning easier to absorbe.
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Old 06-19-2017, 02:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
many speakers are up against the wall and no sight of acoustic treatment.
Most studios have more than one pair of monitors and the "main monitors" may not be visible in the photo.

Also, they are laid-out for "workflow" and efficiency with the console & engineer facing the glass (and close to the glass). There's functionally no need for a "deep" room, and the width probably approximately matches the width of the recording studio.

Certainly there will be some acoustic treatment and LOTs of soundproofing. A "control room" doesn't have to be a studio, and radio/TV studios don't need "great" acoustics, although they need to be soundproofed and reasonably dead.


Quote:
So pardon the dumb question, is music not mixed in this environment as well?
Possibly... A mixing/mastering room doesn't need a glass window into the recording studio. I assume a large recording facility (the few remaining) have separate mixing studios so you don't have to shut-down recording while mixing or vice/versa, and of course both can be VERY time consuming. (The mastering will generally be done somewhere else.)

Quote:
And how is this different from our home studios.
Soundproofed, measured, calibrated, and tweaked. ...And better monitors (and better other equipment) than we can afford!

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Old 06-19-2017, 02:51 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Tom Hidley's history makes fascinating reading if you are an audio geek....
Tom Hidley, wow that's a name from the past. I met Tom in the very early 70s when he had his studio on Wilshire Blvrd, I bought my first Multi track setup from him. He gave me a complete tour of his studio and at the time I had just recently finished my own first studio and needless to say, I was pretty impressed.

I finished my last control room in 79 going into 80 and I've still got that.

As already mentioned, there are no parallel walls or surfaces. Back in those days, the LEDE design was "very in" and that's the way I designed my control room.

The left/right speakers are floating, built into the walls and are surrounded with cork on the outside face.

If I were to rebuild it today, there is no doubt I would do it a little bit differently, but at my age that ain't going to happen.
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