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View Full Version : Sick of my sound...


jalan
06-01-2010, 04:30 PM
Hey, guys. Any suggestions for good books, videos, podcasts, etc on chord progressions/voicings, whatever...? I've been trying to write some new material and I'm sick of my own sound -- need something to bust up the writers block.

FYI, I'm a guitar player and am into (somewhat) heavier stuff -- huge into the new Karnivool disc right now and love Tool (which is why I'd like to try and get a little more ambitious), but used to play more mainstream stuff like Chevelle, Sevendust, Rage (who I still love), NIN, etc. (yes, I'm kind of stuck in the 90s) :-)

Anyway, any suggestions would be great. Thanks in advance!

J

Sound asleep
06-01-2010, 06:14 PM
theory probably won't help you too much in this really. particularly that theory will tend to be all about kinds of music you don't much like and stuff like that which will make it all seem like a chore. imo your best bet is to learn other songs you like. songs you like that aren't a sound you're sick of. even songs in completely other styles you like that are a style you aren't sick of. and then stuff you learn from those you can morph to fit with the style of music you want to make. also different sounds on your guitar might click some new stuff.

zoso2
06-01-2010, 06:31 PM
theory probably won't help you too much in this really. particularly that theory will tend to be all about kinds of music you don't much like and stuff like that which will make it all seem like a chore. imo your best bet is to learn other songs you like. songs you like that aren't a sound you're sick of. even songs in completely other styles you like that are a style you aren't sick of. and then stuff you learn from those you can morph to fit with the style of music you want to make. also different sounds on your guitar might click some new stuff.

biggest crock of shit i've ever heard. you will only benefit from theory. if you understand theory you can build your own chords and progressions if you know how those chords then relate to others. sounds like your mistaking theory for romantic era music history

brainwreck
06-01-2010, 10:21 PM
listen to tons of music across genres. i'm not saying to listen to music which you don't like, but at the same time, i sort of am. when you listen to something, try and figure out why you do or don't like it. forget about what's in, the latest and greatest, etc. more mindful listening can sometimes draw you in to some music which you might not have given a chance before. maybe by listening to the same type of music all of the time, you're boring your imagination, which is reflected in your own music. also, i think the idea that a person's music must fall within the boundaries of a genre is retarded. that might be fine and all when studying a genre, but it doesn't leave much leg room for creativity. more than anything, i'd say to try and ween yourself from being spoon fed music from the mainstream. even most mainstream music is heavily influenced by stuff that will never get played on corporate radio or music video channels.

i also don't agree with the comment about avoiding music theory. theory isn't a set of hard rules by which you write music (it isn't to me any way). it's a tool that can help you figure out what's going on in a piece of music, and it can help you in finding notes and chords when working out your own ideas. i think the idea with theory is to learn it well and try to forget it. at the same time, you don't need music theory at all to make some great music. punk kicked that idea in the teeth.

bob
06-02-2010, 01:05 AM
brainwrecks comments are spot on.

You have to develop a musical imagination,like a painter Dali for instance!,,you also have to have the technical ability to execute and fulfill your imagination,the so called "chops".Theory is important in the beginning how are chords built how are scales made and what the relationship between the two are etc etc Harmony
Frank Zappa had one of the best musical imaginations of recent times,,listen to Apostrophe or One Size Fits All or Joes Garage or Sheik Yerbouti and you will quickly see how inventive and imaginative music can be.

One last thing.Never try to force a song.I always find a song arises more or less spontaneously sometimes even finished in my imagination, it is then just a process of transferring it from my head to the recorder.

Here are two examples of people using their imaginations.A song about New Potatoes(Zappa influenced in parts)

http://www.soundclick.com/player/single_player.cfm?songid=9197445&q=hi&newref=1

and this is my effort.

http://www.soundclick.com/player/single_player.cfm?songid=9223417&q=hi&newref=1

and this one combines chops nice melodies and unusual time signatures.
http://www.soundclick.com/player/single_player.cfm?songid=9218717&q=hi&newref=1