View Single Post
Old 01-04-2019, 03:03 PM   #18
Gerrit
Human being with feelings
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Maastricht
Posts: 86
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by benf View Post
I was thinking of those 24 steps rotary encoders : https://www.gotronic.fr/pj-66.pdf, not optical ones because they look a bit expensive to me. Don't you think they are strong or precise enough ?
My purpose is to use one for volume, another one for panning/width (with a button to switch) and a last one to select tracks, navigate on the timeline and through regions (with another function switching button).
I will too have buttons for mute, solo, record and automation modes for the track control (I just need to control one track at a time).
Other buttons for play and record and probably some for track templates additions.
I will have a display for the track name, its volume level and panning indications.
That's all for the moment.
24 pulses will translate to 96 steps per revolution. Because in OSC values are passed as normalised floating point numbers you can always map the 96 steps to cover the full range of a parameter. The question is if you think that's enough, it might not be if you want to use the controller for 'riding the knobs'.
For track selection it is not important to have hight resolution so inexpensive encoders will do.
It's a question of of how far you want to go with the build. Do you intend to make your own front panel for the controller or have it made for you?

Beware of overloading functions. On my controller there's a scroll wheel that scrolls through the song or selects presets on a synth depending on the mode the controller is in and I often found myself changing sounds when I wanted to scroll through the song.
Here's a picture of my plugin and synth controller:



It currently uses Mackie Control Protocol over two virtual midi ports and a separate port for synth control. I used 64PPR (256 steps per revolution) EM14 rotary encoders because I wanted to cover the MIDI range (0-127) with a single 300 degree turn so as to mimic the movement of a potmeter. The result is that the movement of the encoder, the virtual knob on the controller screen and the one on the computer monitor all perfectly match.
When I have finished my sequencer project I'll start on changing the code of this controller to also support OSC.
Gerrit is offline   Reply With Quote