Old 07-23-2019, 11:07 AM   #1
Coachz
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Default Stereo Compression

This video speaks of a stereo compressor being used on 2 guitars and gluing them together. So is it the threshold is activated by both so tends to push whichever channel is too loud thereby gluing them?

https://youtu.be/fpb3KpWVWKw?t=588
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Old 07-23-2019, 11:13 AM   #2
karbomusic
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I think so, probably easy to test.
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Old 07-23-2019, 01:31 PM   #3
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I'm not sure what practical difference it makes, how much difference do you hear? Not the same riff as the video but same idea...

1. Stereo track of two performances as L/R through a stereo compressor - either channel triggers compression on both L & R:

http://wallsonic.com/public/posts/stereocompressed.wav

2. Same tracks through a dual mono setup with identical settings - each side only triggers it's own side of the compressor only:

http://wallsonic.com/public/posts/du...compressed.wav

I'm compression off about 7 dB off of each FWIW - it may make more difference the cleaner the tone but if it get's much cleaner it'll be too clean. I would think dual mono would be more even but I'm not hearing that much difference when comparing them.
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Old 07-23-2019, 01:43 PM   #4
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What are your attack and release times at, Karbo?

In my experience, a summed-to-mono detection circuit can glue double tracked, panned guitars when using slowish attack and fast release. It helps to shape their attack portions in common so that they sound more like a single source.

Dual mono compressors keep the sense of width better, but at the expense of the phantom centre moving (not likely to be an issue with two guitars in unison, but a potential problem for a drum bus or whole mix).
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Old 07-23-2019, 01:59 PM   #5
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I set them kind of fast to give more chance to react/recover loosely based on the cadence of the rhythm - it's the CLA 1176 so it doesn't have precise times and clockwise = faster - that seemed more obvious to my ear but maybe I was wrong. Either way, I'm interested in demonstrable results. It's possible it's more prevalent in context where there are other elements to poke out from or under.

I'm not really sure the mention in the video of using a stereo compressor is the thing that is being heard per se but.. I could see setting attack/release to interact properly might or again, doesn't matter much until in context and competing with other tracks.
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Last edited by karbomusic; 07-23-2019 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 07-23-2019, 02:44 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karbomusic View Post
I set them kind of fast to give more chance to react/recover loosely based on the cadence of the rhythm - it's the CLA 1176 so it doesn't have precise times and clockwise = faster - that seemed more obvious to my ear but maybe I was wrong. Either way, I'm interested in demonstrable results. It's possible it's more prevalent in context where there are other elements to poke out from or under.

I'm not really sure the mention in the video of using a stereo compressor is the thing that is being heard per se but.. I could see setting attack/release to interact properly might or again, doesn't matter much until in context and competing with other tracks.
Can't post an example right now, but it's when you hit it hard with a slower attack to get the bark from the guitars. Most obvious with choppy guitar parts.

I'm away from home and then moving house, so I won't be able to post any examples for a week or two, unfortunately.
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