Old 07-31-2021, 06:22 PM   #1
dsealer
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Default Recording drums

I'm in the process of recording a drum kit. When I record my own stuff I use EzD. However I have a band in to record some stuff and they are using a drum kit. I've got five mics on the drums.
Kick AKG D112
Snare Sennheiser 421
Drum Tom's Sennheiser 421
Floor tom Sm 57
Overhead AT MB4000C

Problem is I get cymbal bleed in all the mics. I don't care much about most of the bleed except that bleed in the snare drum mic. It's hard for me to get a good sounding snare with the cymbal bleed.
Any suggestions how to fix this?

Thanks,
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Old 07-31-2021, 06:53 PM   #2
SMM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsealer View Post
I'm in the process of recording a drum kit. When I record my own stuff I use EzD. However I have a band in to record some stuff and they are using a drum kit. I've got five mics on the drums.
Kick AKG D112
Snare Sennheiser 421
Drum Tom's Sennheiser 421
Floor tom Sm 57
Overhead AT MB4000C

Problem is I get cymbal bleed in all the mics. I don't care much about most of the bleed except that bleed in the snare drum mic. It's hard for me to get a good sounding snare with the cymbal bleed.
Any suggestions how to fix this?

Thanks,
Your set up is a SM57 on the floor tom
and a MD421 on the snare????

I will make a suggestion.
Reverse your set up to this:
Snare drum: SM57.
Floor Tom: MD421.

Note, when I record drums,
my basic/standard set up is listed below:

Kick: AKG D112.
Snare (top and bottom head): Shure SM57
(phase reversed on bottom snare mic).
Toms and floor toms: Sennheiser MD421.
Overheads: Neumann KM184.

I have also used AKG C451b microphones as overheads
with good results in the past along with many other
types of microphones used as overheads
(the overheads are another story).

Happy recording.
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Last edited by SMM; 07-31-2021 at 07:44 PM.
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Old 07-31-2021, 08:19 PM   #3
dug dog
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Ah, the joys of recording real drums... Unfortunately, bleed is a fact of life.

Careful positioning of the snare mic is important and, if possible, you want to set it up so that the hi hat is in the quietest part of the snare mic's response pattern.

Is the drummer hitting the cymbals too hard? It wouldn't be the first time and a conversation with the drummer is sometimes necessary. Swapping out the cymbals for something quieter can help, too, if that's an option.

When you get to the mixing stage, the "standard" solutions are to run a gate on the snare track and/or use it to trigger an EZD snare sample. Same thing applies to toms. You could also try this cool trick for dealing with cymbal/hi hat bleed:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fR3mKXORiiw


Good luck.
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