Old 02-25-2015, 11:48 PM   #1
TheFlavor
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 214
Default Spotify -> WAV

I'm not a lawyer but when I Wikipedia "Fair use", I see: "Fair use is a doctrine that permits limited use of copyrighted material without acquiring permission from the rights holders. Examples of fair use include... research...."

I'd like to research some music on Spotify and wondering how technically to get it into WAV format?
TheFlavor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2015, 12:23 AM   #2
jerome_oneil
Human being with feelings
 
jerome_oneil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,651
Default

That's not fair use. You go to the store and buy the CD if you want it in WAV.
jerome_oneil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2015, 06:53 AM   #3
Jason Brian Merrill
Human being with feelings
 
Jason Brian Merrill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Northeastern PA, USA
Posts: 20,417
Default

even if you are researching it, you probably wouldn't want to get it from spotify. likely they are using a compressed format which wouldn't be suitable for research anyway.
__________________
Beliefs do not require respect. People do.
Jason Brian Merrill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2015, 10:53 AM   #4
Quest The Wordsmith
Human being with feelings
 
Quest The Wordsmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Staten Island, NY
Posts: 1,208
Default

You hit record in Reaper, play in spotify, and reminisce back to the days of cassettes and radio.
__________________
freestylefam.com (music)
aaroncordova.xyz (personal)
Quest The Wordsmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2018, 08:39 PM   #5
ericmcmahon
Human being with feelings
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 3
Default

Hey, have you try to use TuneFab Spotify Music Converter for making your Spotify Music to WAV file formats.
ericmcmahon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2018, 01:22 AM   #6
G-Sun
Human being with feelings
 
G-Sun's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Norway
Posts: 6,391
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ericmcmahon View Post
Hey, have you try to use TuneFab Spotify Music Converter for making your Spotify Music to WAV file formats.
Is that software legal?
__________________
Reaper x64, win 8.1
G-Sun.no - Music Blog - My music
G-Sun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2018, 05:28 AM   #7
Stella645
Human being with feelings
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 362
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Sun View Post
Is that software legal?
The downloader softwares are legal (currently)
Using them to download copyright material is illegal.
Stella645 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2018, 06:17 PM   #8
ericmcmahon
Human being with feelings
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Sun View Post
Is that software legal?
I think if you use this tool for personal usage is OK rather than other usages.
ericmcmahon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 02:57 AM   #9
brynolf
Human being with feelings
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 89
Default

Voicemeeter can do it https://www.vb-audio.com/Voicemeeter/index.htm
brynolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 06:20 AM   #10
Stella645
Human being with feelings
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 362
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ericmcmahon View Post
I think if you use this tool for personal usage is OK rather than other usages.
Only if you consider breaking the law to be OK!
Stella645 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 12:41 PM   #11
vdubreeze
Human being with feelings
 
vdubreeze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 1,039
Default

I'm fairly certain making a wav copy for oneself off of a streaming service is *not* considered fair use of something one has paid for. It's wishful thinking muddling it with the rights as a purchaser of the files as CD or download, which is only ever buying the right to use the audio. Ownership to do with it whatever one wants is never an option with CDs/downloads.

Lets not even get into the fact that it's saying fuck you to the artist you're making the wav of. Artists are fucked enough by the dominance of streaming services. Why twist the knife?
__________________
The reason rain dances work is because they don't stop dancing until it rains.
vdubreeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 06:57 PM   #12
drumphil
Human being with feelings
 
drumphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,910
Default

I think there are a few things being mixed up here.

Depending on where you are, copyright law does allow for the copying of copyrighted material for certain purposes.

However the laws like DMCA (digital millennium copyright act) mean that depending on where you are it can be illegal to use software or devices that circumvent technological copy protection measures.

That's how you end up with lawyers arguing that you can't decrypt a DVD to make a copy of a part of it even if the use would be legal. They actually suggested that teachers, for instance, could point a camera at their TV to copy the section they needed without using software that breaks the copy protection of the disc.

That actually happened during hearings on exemptions to the DMCA in the US. The situation is slightly mad. They were arguing against an exemption that would allow people to decrypt DVD's for legal uses because they don't want it to be legal for anyone to write such software at all, even though there are legitimate uses, and then proposed that teachers could use cameras, which even though lower quality, still defeats the technological protection measures.

So they are logically inconsistent, but they don't care so long as they can keep DVD decrypting software illegal.

Then you get into issues of terms of service. Assuming that the source doesn't have a TPM (Technological Protection Measure) in place that would prevent downloading of the content, and would cause you to violate the DMCA in order to defeat the protection, leaving you able to download the file for a legal use, you still may be in violation of the terms of service of the site you get the file from. This however isn't a crime. *

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/0...rime-bypassing

Quote:
Good news: another federal judge has ruled that violating a website terms of service is not a crime. But there's bad news, too — the court also found that bypassing technical or code-based barriers intended to limit access to or uses of a website may violate California's computer crime law.

The decision comes in Facebook v. Power Ventures, a case in which Facebook is suing a company that offers a tool for users to access and aggregate their personal information across social networking sites. Because Facebook's terms of service don't allow users to access their information through "automated means," Facebook claimed that Power accesses its service "without permission" in violation of California Penal Code Section 502. Facebook has also argued that Power broke the law by evading Facebook's effort to block the Power browser’s IP address, which was meant to try to keep users from accessing their Facebook accounts though the Power website.

EFF filed an amicus brief in this case, urging the court to reject Facebook's computer crime claims. We argued that turning any violation of terms of use into a crime would give websites unfettered power to decide what conduct is criminal, leaving millions of Internet users vulnerable to prosecution for everyday activities.

The court agreed with our position, relying heavily on our brief. This part of the ruling is great.

Unfortunately, the court also said that Power might be liable if it changed its IP address so that its browser could continue to interoperate with the Facebook service. In other words, it may be a crime to circumvent technological barriers imposed by a website, even if those measures are taken only to enforce the terms of service through code. There's nothing inherently wrong or unlawful about avoiding IP address blocking, and there are valid reasons why someone might choose to do so, including to sidestep anticompetitive behavior by other Internet services. As long as an end user is authorized to access a computer and the way she chooses doesn't cause harm, she should be able to access the computer any way she likes without committing a crime.

Overall, yesterday's opinion is an important precedent that aligns with United States v. Drew, a decision last year finding that a woman did not violate the federal hacking law when she created a fake MySpace profile, as well as recent Ninth Circuit cases. We welcome the court's rejection of terms of service violations as triggers for criminal liability, but will continue to work to demonstrate to courts that not all technological measures are created equal. If the measure seeks to control access to or use of data, then evasion of it is almost certainly criminal. But if the restriction merely seeks to impose owner preferences or terms of service on otherwise authorized users, bypassing it should not be a crime.

As other courts look at this issue, we hope that they will agree that code-based restrictions require a very fact-specific inquiry, and will remain open to the possibility that bypassing such measures should not necessarily be criminal.
* All of this varies depending on exactly what the law is where you are.

Last edited by drumphil; 01-15-2018 at 06:54 AM.
drumphil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 07:14 PM   #13
drumphil
Human being with feelings
 
drumphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,910
Default

Check out this advice for schools and TAFE institutes in Australia. The rules are different here to the US.

http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/copyr...ction-measures

Quote:
Technological Protection Measures and the Copyright Amendment Act 2006
What are technological protection measures?

'Technological protection measures' is a broad term that covers many different types of technologies used to control access to copyright content, or to prevent users from copying protected content. Content that is protected by a copy protection technology could include movies, games, software, CDs or digital music files, or even content stored in a protected area on a website (eg, where you have to pay money or enter a password to access the content).

There are two types of technological protection measures:

"Access Control Technological Protection Measures " - which we will refer to as 'access control technologies' in this Fact Sheet.
"Copy ControlTechnological Protection Measures " which we will refer to as 'copy control technologies' in this Fact Sheet.

'Circumvention devices' are technologies that are used to remove, disable or circumvent technological protection measures. A 'circumvention service' is a service offered by someone to remove, disable or circumvent a technological protection measure.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT ANY COPYRIGHT CONTENT IN DIGITAL FORMAT COULD BE PROTECTED BY A TECHNOLOGICAL PROTECTION MEASURE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSIDER WHETHER THE REMOVAL OR ALTERATION OF THIS TECHNOLOGICAL PROTECTION MEASURE WOULD BE PROHIBITED BY THE COPYRIGHT ACT.

What are the rules about technological protection measures?

The rules are:

You are allowed to remove, disable or circumvent a copy control technology.
You are almost never allowed to remove, disable or circumvent an access control technology.
This means that schools cannot copy films, sound recordings, games or software in any circumstances if making the copy would involve the circumvention of an access control technology.
There are only 2 situations where you are allowed to remove, disable or circumvent an access control technology:
when you are removing etc the access control technology in order to make a copy from a work in electronic form under the Statutory Print Licence (the Part VB licence administered by the Copyright Agency Ltd – CAL); or
if you have obtained permission from the copyright owner.
You are allowed to manufacture, download or import a circumvention device as long as it is for your own use.
You are never allowed to do the following acts with a circumvention device:
manufacture or import it with the intention of giving it to anyone else (including someone else in a school)
provide or distribute it to another person (including someone else in a school)
offer it to the public (eg, advertising)
communicate it (including emailing, or making it available on an intranet or the internet).
You are never allowed to give a circumvention device to anyone else (including sharing), or provide, or offer to provide, a circumvention service to anyone else (including someone else in a school).

Back to top
What are access control technologies?

Accesscontrol technologies are technological protection measures which are used by copyright owners to control access to their content. Some examples of access control technologies could be:

password control systems (eg, a 'members only' password which limits access to special content on a website to authorised members)
payment systems (eg, where you have to pay a fee to access certain content on a website).
For example, the Choice website has some freely available publications and some publications that are restricted to people who have paid to access them
time access controls (eg, a technology that manages how long you can access copyright content).
For example, some movie download sites allow you to 'rent' and watch a movie for a period of time (eg, 24 hours). An access control disables your access to the film at the end of the 24 hour period.
encryption measures applied to tapes or disks that only allow access to copyright content (eg, the film or music stored on the disk) to authorised players.

What are copy control technologies?

Copy control technologies are technological protections measures applied to copyright content which prevent, inhibit or restrict the doing of a copyright act with that content (eg, making a copy of a protected film, emailing it or putting it online).
Some examples of copy control technologies could be:
a software lock which prevents you from making a copy of a computer program
encryption measures stored on the disk containing a movie or CD which prevent you from copying the movie or songs on the disk
a technology that 'locks' documents to prevent them from being copied (eg, the function that 'locks' a PDF document to stop you from making a copy)
a technology that makes an unauthorised copy of a film unwatchable (eg, some copy protection technologies add elements to the signal produced by a DVD/VHS player which make any recording of the film unwatchable).

Back to top
What can I do if I am not allowed to circumvent an access control technology?

In many situations, it will not be possible to copy a DVD or CD (or other copyright content) because to do so would involve circumventing an access control technology.

This does not mean that schools/TAFEs cannot use these types of content. It just means that you may have to use the content in a different way (ie, in a way that does not involve making a copy).

Teachers are allowed to play music, films and games to students in the following ways:

playing a film on a VHS or DVD player in the classroom
using a centralised VHS or DVD player (eg, in the library) to beam a movie to the classroom via an electronic reticulation system
playing a film or music in class using a computer eg, playing it from the DVD drive of a computer connected to a large screen in the classroom (for a film) or loudspeakers (for music)
playing a film or music to a virtual class (eg, through software such as Centra)
playing a film or music from a learning management system eg, playing an educational resource that has been legally stored on Clickview
making a copy of a film from television (under the Part VA licence administered by Screenrights) and making a digital copy of this version of the film.


Frequently asked questions about technological protection measures
WARNING!!!!!!

It is very important to realise that each technological protection measure works differently. Different types of content (eg, VHS tapes, DVDs, CDs and computer games) may have different types of technological protection measures.


IT IS NOT ALWAYS EASY TO WORK OUT IF A PARTICULAR PROTECTION MEASURE IS AN 'ACCESS CONTROL' OR A 'COPY CONTROL' TECHNOLOGY.

Note: these frequently asked questions relate mostly to copying movies on DVD or video tape and music CDs. If you have a question about other technologies or types of content, please contact your local CAG representative.

How do I know if something is an access control technology or a copy control technology.

As there are so many different types of technologies out there, this is very a difficult question to answer. There is no hard and fast rule that can be applied to determine which type of technology each one is. Ultimately each type of technolgical protection measure needs to be analysed against the technical definitions in the Copyright Act to determine whether it is an access control technology or a copy control technology.
Clear as mud eh?
drumphil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 02:51 PM   #14
vdubreeze
Human being with feelings
 
vdubreeze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 1,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drumphil View Post


Clear as mud eh?
Yikes. So is this like it's completely legal in my state to smoke marijuana recreationally sun up to sun down but it's illegal to possess a joint?
__________________
The reason rain dances work is because they don't stop dancing until it rains.
vdubreeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.