Old 08-21-2019, 12:37 PM   #1
ChrisBlue
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I am interested in peoples thoughts about Room Eq Wizard, is it something you employ? Is it acurate
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:01 PM   #2
Stella645
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I guess it's as accurate as the mic you use it with.
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:22 PM   #3
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Well, in general I've had mixed results with it, but when you interpret your measurements intelligently, I think REW can help you quite a lot.

But to be a bit more precise, I'll tell you my story: I recently moved to a new studio and, after that, invested in a second (smaller) pair of monitors which sport a DSP and are therefore able to correct the sound (Neumann KH80 DSPs to be precise), and also added a graphic EQ to my other monitors. So I measured the two pairs one by one with a measurement mic, always left and right solo, and then the stereo sum.

It's rather fiddly to calibrate the systm properly, but that's a quite crucial step which the software leads you through. I used an Android app SPL meter to verify the levels and calibrated to a max SPL of 85 dB.

It took some time to interpret the graphs properly, though I decided to only work on the frequencies below 600 Hz, as normally the room modes mostly occur in the lower registers.

With the EQ of the Neumanns, and after interpreting the measurement graphs, I was able to correct the most significant peaks and notches quite exact (with a Q level of up to 10, you can get quite surgical). According to the graphs, the modes were pretty extreme, going up or down by up to 15 or 17dB. The Graphical EQ of the other speaker pair wasn't nearly as precise, but with up to +-12 dB, it damped the room modes quite a bit.

Now, for a good room correction, it isn't really necessary to go the hardware route, only for me it was better because I do quite a lot out of the box and wanted the sound also without the computer. But Reaper gives you the possibility of a monitoring FX chain, so with a nice linear phase EQ, you can keep it all ITB.

A friend of mine had very good results with Sonarworks, but that's a bit more costly, and at the same time it's, erm, software. So it isn't for me
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:58 PM   #4
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Yeah... I've never used it, but I've never heard of any "accuracy problems" and I can't think of any reason for it to be inaccurate (as long as you are using a calibrated measurement mic).


But, you can't fix everything with EQ... You can't fix a standing wave node (where the waves cancel) because it takes (nearly) infinite power and (nearly) infinitely-large woofers. And, you can't EQ-out ringing or unwanted reverb.


It's usually worth measuring your studio (and monitors) so you know what you are dealing with and it's required if you are going to acoustically-treat your room. Diagnosis before treatment! Then, verify the treatment made an improvement.
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Old 08-22-2019, 06:14 AM   #5
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oops already done the treatment and was interested to see what it gives with REW now that I've come across it. Thanks everyone for their thoughts
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:28 AM   #6
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It's a great tool for testing gear for distortion/freq response/phase linearity, stuff like that.

Coupled with a measurement mic, it's also great for measuring acoustic response of a room. The most useful thing it displays is 'waterfall' response, which shows the reverb decay of various freqs. This quickly shows bass peak nodes (which tend to ring longer after the sound is gone), which tells you whether you need bass trapping.
It's also great for getting an overall picture of high bass & low midrange variation as the mic is moved around the listening space. Tons of variation means some broadband absorbers are needed.

Another use is to generate a convolution file to compensate for speaker+room response in both frequency and time domains, by inverting the measured response of each speaker and writing it to an impulse response file which can be used in the monitor chain to somewhat compensate for shortcomings.
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Old 08-23-2019, 02:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBlue View Post
oops already done the treatment and was interested to see what it gives with REW now that I've come across it. Thanks everyone for their thoughts
It's best use is before, during and after treatment. Don't just blindly hang panels, shoot the room, hang some, shoot it again, move them around, rinse and repeat until as flat as possible - you need to use the waterfall plots because how long problem frequencies ring often take priority. This may also include adjustments to monitors and listening position. Obviously, the first couple panels are no-brainers, the sides to the left and right of your ears to kill early reflections and likely corners for bass traps but in my experience, all the magic/work happens right after that when hanging the rest of them to fix the remaining problems. Problems you likely are going to be unaware of until you do the measurements.

The last room I did, I spent several hours hanging then moving the final 3 panels and the positions that cured the problem were the LAST place I ever thought they would be.
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Old 08-23-2019, 07:38 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karbomusic View Post
It's best use is before, during and after treatment. Don't just blindly hang panels, shoot the room, hang some, shoot it again, move them around, rinse and repeat until as flat as possible - you need to use the waterfall plots because how long problem frequencies ring often take priority. This may also include adjustments to monitors and listening position. Obviously, the first couple panels are no-brainers, the sides to the left and right of your ears to kill early reflections and likely corners for bass traps but in my experience, all the magic/work happens right after that when hanging the rest of them to fix the remaining problems. Problems you likely are going to be unaware of until you do the measurements.

The last room I did, I spent several hours hanging then moving the final 3 panels and the positions that cured the problem were the LAST place I ever thought they would be.
100% agree. I spent 3 days of testing to find the optimal places to hang 12 absorber panels. And it was worth every second; the acoustics improvement was pretty amazing.
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