Old 12-06-2018, 09:11 AM   #1
Bjorn.LaSanche
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Default AirWindows plugin help

I was wondering if anyone has a few minutes to give me a brief rundown on where the AirWindows plugins should be installed at? Do I just drop them into the vst folders I have set up on my computer? Do they need to be in the root folder, or will I be able to create a file structure such as c:\vst64\AirWindows\<plugin name>?

In a situation such as Console4 There are folders packed within the zip Are those needed on a windows system as they appear to contain Mac files? There isnt really any help from Chris' site and I am figuring one is to assume proper installation placement.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:25 AM   #2
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You can drop them in the path you described. As long as it is in the defined VST folder you can use subfolders.


If you are on a Windows system you can ignore everything in the MAC folder, you only need the .dll to be in the VST folder.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:25 AM   #3
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Yeah, you just need to copy the .dll files into whatever vst folder you want.
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Old 12-06-2018, 11:57 AM   #4
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Keep in mind that the Console plugins require very specific setup/placement and then require you to give up using the track faders in Reaper. You can get a similar effect with the channel, buss, tape and desk plugins, running something like channel/buss + tape on every track and desk+tape on the master. This method doesn't have any rules about plugin order and lets you continue using the DAW as normal, but still gives the feel of working with analog. ToTape5 is amazing, btw...
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Old 12-06-2018, 04:05 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by foxAsteria View Post
Keep in mind that the Console plugins require very specific setup/placement and then require you to give up using the track faders in Reaper. You can get a similar effect with the channel, buss, tape and desk plugins, running something like channel/buss + tape on every track and desk+tape on the master. This method doesn't have any rules about plugin order and lets you continue using the DAW as normal, but still gives the feel of working with analog. ToTape5 is amazing, btw...
Thanks I appreciate the heads up. Have you found out which are his master track plugins and what can be used elsewhere? Also would you mind explaining the Console plugin setup?
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Old 12-07-2018, 01:51 AM   #6
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Hi Bjorn,

I am certainly no expert (actually the opposite) but I have been trying to get my head around AW Console and I came across this quote from Chris (Hi, I'm Chris from Air Windows) in a recent Gearslutz thread.


"Console works in two parts: ConsoleChannel on the end of all source tracks/channels and then ConsoleBuss at the beginning of the 2-buss. It's for replacing the digital summing buss with an Airwindows one, it expects all the gains between the two plugs to be unity gain (including faders, unless you have post-fader plugin slots which would be ideal).

You can replace instances of ConsoleChannel with BussColors so long as you leave the output trim and dry/wet as default. The different models are all calibrated to work with ConsoleBuss that way.

Console expects to see one instance of ConsoleChannel (or BussColors as a replacement) and one instance of ConsoleBuss to 'decode' it, from source to output."


My DAW PC is down at present so I have no way of testing the results, but I hope it helps.

rob
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Old 12-07-2018, 02:48 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Bjorn.LaSanche View Post
Thanks I appreciate the heads up. Have you found out which are his master track plugins and what can be used elsewhere? Also would you mind explaining the Console plugin setup?
Desk (tube or trans) plugs on the master, channel plugs on the channels, buss plugs on the busses and tape everywhere. I don't use console, I just know it's not flexible in where you place things. Either way the effect is very subtle (except for tape, which can be extreme), so just experiment. The effect is also cumulative, so put stuff on every channel and then bypass them all to really hear it.
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:45 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by westie07 View Post
Hi Bjorn,

I am certainly no expert (actually the opposite) but I have been trying to get my head around AW Console and I came across this quote from Chris (Hi, I'm Chris from Air Windows) in a recent Gearslutz thread.


"Console works in two parts: ConsoleChannel on the end of all source tracks/channels and then ConsoleBuss at the beginning of the 2-buss. It's for replacing the digital summing buss with an Airwindows one, it expects all the gains between the two plugs to be unity gain (including faders, unless you have post-fader plugin slots which would be ideal).

You can replace instances of ConsoleChannel with BussColors so long as you leave the output trim and dry/wet as default. The different models are all calibrated to work with ConsoleBuss that way.

Console expects to see one instance of ConsoleChannel (or BussColors as a replacement) and one instance of ConsoleBuss to 'decode' it, from source to output."


My DAW PC is down at present so I have no way of testing the results, but I hope it helps.

rob
Thanks Rob, like anything experimentation is the key I suppose.
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:47 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by foxAsteria View Post
Desk (tube or trans) plugs on the master, channel plugs on the channels, buss plugs on the busses and tape everywhere. I don't use console, I just know it's not flexible in where you place things. Either way the effect is very subtle (except for tape, which can be extreme), so just experiment. The effect is also cumulative, so put stuff on every channel and then bypass them all to really hear it.
Thanks. I’m going to have a go with this and see how the outcome pans out. Seems a lot easier and more straightforward than using the Console plugin. At least more of what I am used to in my workflow. Wouldn’t using Tape on a bus be a little counterintuitive?
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Old 12-07-2018, 11:07 AM   #10
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Wouldn’t using Tape on a bus be a little counterintuitive?
Why would it? The idea here is emulating old workflows, which involved a lot of tape. Tracking to tape, bouncing submixes to tape etc. But it's best of both worlds here, since we can just use as much or little tape compression/coloration as we like and don't get any of the audible noise, mechanical problems or limitations. Use to taste. On the channels, tape gives you enriched harmonics and gentle compression; simple and effective tone shaping and dynamics control, and on the busses you also get glue.

Don't get trapped by the idea of doing things "correctly." There's a very famous song with a very famous guitar tone that was created by taking a pencil and punching a hole through the speaker cone. There is no "correct" way. The only rules are the physics of sound.
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Old 12-10-2018, 10:45 PM   #11
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Why would it? The idea here is emulating old workflows, which involved a lot of tape. Tracking to tape, bouncing submixes to tape etc. But it's best of both worlds here, since we can just use as much or little tape compression/coloration as we like and don't get any of the audible noise, mechanical problems or limitations. Use to taste. On the channels, tape gives you enriched harmonics and gentle compression; simple and effective tone shaping and dynamics control, and on the busses you also get glue.

Don't get trapped by the idea of doing things "correctly." There's a very famous song with a very famous guitar tone that was created by taking a pencil and punching a hole through the speaker cone. There is no "correct" way. The only rules are the physics of sound.
You know, you’re absolutely correct. I wasn’t thinking at it from that angle.
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