Old 05-23-2018, 10:40 AM   #1
Jimmy James
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Default Dual Mono AC GTR

Howdy all. I have been recording the most acoustic tracks I have ever done. All these guys do is pretty much acoustic. I have been trying a lot of different stuff. So far, my best set up is as follows.

Bluebird foot away racing the 15th fret. And a Ribbon overhead over the body side. And sometimes I use a room Mic depending on how soft they play.

Now, when I have a dual mono, is it worth it to process each TRACK? I have been panning one at say left 55 and the other left 45. Sent to a Buss. The I put the Focusrite 2&3 plugins on it.

Am I going to find trouble down the road by panning at say 10 or 12 APART?

Should I eq and comp each track or just Buss them?
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Old 05-23-2018, 04:57 PM   #2
karbomusic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmy James View Post
So far, my best set up is as follows.
Neck on one side then at the body pointing at the floor on the other side (similar to what you describe) is one of my favorite methods. Test them in mono/panned center to check for phase issues (which I've found in practice to be fairly minimal), if OK, do whatever you want with them.. One of the reasons I like the method is versatility...

1. Pan them sort of wide and it leaves the perfect hole in the middle for a vocal without having to resort to ITB tricks to create a stereo field for the guitar.

2. You can choose one or the other if needed.

3. You can blend and monoize them if the phase interaction is OK.

Even in a band setting, those choices are good to have at mixing time.
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:03 PM   #3
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Different mics + different positions = different EQ and compression needs.

I'd do something like this:
Code:
Acoustic folder
---- Mic A, 100% left
---- Mic B, 100% right
Then you can process them individually on their tracks, and use the folder for overall levelling, automation, reverb, chorus, etc - things that wouldn't make much sense to do per-mic.

By keeping them 100% panned, you can also use the folder's stereo width (or a width plugin) to pan them inward to wherever you want without affecting how they interact with the folder's effects.
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:12 PM   #4
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Not to be argumentative but depending on how it's used, it's usually better treat these fairly equally and with less than more processing as the technique itself is very natural sounding. If you start processing them separately you are likely removing part of their biggest benefit - It's not something I'd sit up arguing but that micing technique usually needs very little processing to begin with in my few years of direct experience using it - YMMV.

You'll have to skip around to see it but it should be this position: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRIelhLED
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:32 PM   #5
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I completely agree; with acoustic instruments, less processing is ideal. The setup above would work just as well with no effects, but it leaves room for individual processing should the need arise.

For instance, maybe the neck mic is getting some annoying string squeak that the body mic isn't. No reason to EQ both of them to get rid of it when you have the neck track right there. Likewise, maybe the body mic is getting too much click from the pick/fingernails and you want to shave a bit off of the peaks - no reason to compress the neck mic.
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Last edited by Lokasenna; 05-23-2018 at 05:39 PM.
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:34 PM   #6
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I can't disagree really, I'm pretty sure I was happy enough with it as-is that I simply never got around to trying it separately, thusly I can't dismiss it entirely - just depends. I really like that micing technique either way.
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Old 05-23-2018, 06:12 PM   #7
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just throwing in - for the overwhelmingly acoustic stuff of mine am mixing now i plumped after much experimentation for M/S pretty close to guitar (with a dash of pickup) - with ribbon on vocal nulling@ the body.

i like wide guitar acoustic parts but only from one 'part' and not doubly trickery.
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Old 05-23-2018, 06:28 PM   #8
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That's why I like this one, two mics, one part, sounds cool and less calories than the leading brand.
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Old 05-23-2018, 07:08 PM   #9
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Indeedy - does seem versatul (as Americans would say..)

For my needs was also trying to battle bleed, due to warbling at the same time, hence my decision path.
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Old 05-24-2018, 05:40 AM   #10
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Another usable option is a mid-side mic pair a 3 or 4 feet away if you have a quiet and good sounding room. I've used it for bluegrass-style ensembles, where the group is arranged in a half-circle, and whoever is soloing steps forward a bit during their solo. Amazing stereo imaging, and it pretty much mixes itself.
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Old 05-24-2018, 04:15 PM   #11
Jimmy James
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Thanks guys. I guess I was worried I was being "Lazy" by using eq and comp on both tracks. It seems this might be standardractice though.

I also see the point of processing each Mic. O e Mic might have something that needs eq`d out that the other doesn't.

Mostly all acoustic guitars is new for me. I always did a acoustic track along with a rock band or something. But never all acoustic guitars.

Now I have put 1 performance, 2 mics, on the left. Panned 65 and 55. Put on a Buss with Focusrite 3 compressor and the Waves Manny EQ. Another 1 performance, 2 mics panned 60 and 50 on the right. Sent to a new Buss with the same fx.

The Focusrite 2 as sounded the most natural, but had a boxy or quack type sound I couldn't get rid of. The Manny EQ I could get rid of this sound though. But it sounds more processed.

A lot of acoustic guitar tracks is way different than a rock band or blues. And don't even get me started on "intonation".
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Old 05-24-2018, 04:21 PM   #12
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I will check for permission, but I might post a mp3 clip soon, see if you guys here something I am missing. I am the type of person who always seeks advice and knowledge, no matter how long I have been doing something.

I was asked to throw a little lead down. So I cut a lead on a Martin. I noticed it set right in the mix, but in a bad way. I tried Kramer tape first, then settled on Softube Saturation.
The saturation let me set the lead right on top of the mix. New trick I have for my back pocket now. Anyone know any other tricks like this?
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