Old 08-10-2017, 03:39 PM   #1
buzzardwhiskey
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Default Layering percussion

My band and I are recording our second CD ourselves using lots of "layers" rather than how we did it on our first CD (in a studio where everyone had one or more mics and we all played at once into a system with at least a dozen A-to-D converters).

I've created a temporary drum track using EZ Drummer 2. Then I've recorded my acoustic guitar(s). Then we recorded a bass, mandolin, resonator guitar and so on.

So far so good. We're actually very excited about the quality. Soon we will record vocals as well, and lastly I'm hoping to replace the "fake" drums with real percussive elements. And I have questions...

My interface is an Audient iD14 with two mic pre's.

1) Is it possible to "disassemble" a groovy drum beat into its components and record them as layers like we're doing with the rest of the project? Or will a good finished product we too difficult to achieve?
2) What should I start with first? Second? Etc...
3) Do you have any tips or gotchas?

Thank you for your time.
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Old 08-10-2017, 11:24 PM   #2
MrBongo
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hell no.

Don´t even try. Unless you want it to sound like an undefined mess
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Old 08-11-2017, 06:01 AM   #3
buzzardwhiskey
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Hmm...

Here's my methodology... we'll swap out the midi, one "type of drum" at a time.

So I'm thinking, turn off the midi kick and record some kind of real kick (maybe using two mics). The drummer needn't follow the midi pattern but could if she wants.

Then turn off the midi snare and record a real snare. And so on.

At each point, the drummer is free to do their own thing. When all is said and done we'll have real drums!

Because we do folk music, and the drums are often quite spare rather than the huge element of a rock band, I still have hope. But you might be right, MrBongo.
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Old 08-11-2017, 06:15 AM   #4
kstn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzardwhiskey View Post
Hmm...

Here's my methodology... we'll swap out the midi, one "type of drum" at a time.

So I'm thinking, turn off the midi kick and record some kind of real kick (maybe using two mics). The drummer needn't follow the midi pattern but could if she wants.

Then turn off the midi snare and record a real snare. And so on.

At each point, the drummer is free to do their own thing. When all is said and done we'll have real drums!

Because we do folk music, and the drums are often quite spare rather than the huge element of a rock band, I still have hope. But you might be right, MrBongo.
AFAIR drums at Joy Divison albums was recorded similar way. So you can try and look at the result - may be it will be suitable for you.
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Old 08-11-2017, 09:02 AM   #5
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How can I spend 20 hours doing something that 150-200 dollars in a pro studio could accomplish in 1?

Why not just book the studio time
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Old 08-11-2017, 10:12 AM   #6
buzzardwhiskey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergler View Post
How can I spend 20 hours doing something that 150-200 dollars in a pro studio could accomplish in 1?

Why not just book the studio time
Your point is well taken... seriously.

There are two answers.

1) Doing it myself, no matter the time investment is a reward in and of itself.
2) I figure that each song in the studio will require about 45 minutes to an hour. At $65 to $125 per hour (figure $80) that's about $800 for the album. It's a small stretch but I can do it, and I may end up doing it.
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Old 08-12-2017, 02:58 AM   #7
foxAsteria
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I'd suggest that instead of replacing, you emphasize. An electronic drum line that sounds a bit lifeless can easily be livened up just by recording some real drum hits or cymbals to blend with it.

Also there's little reason to get attached to recorded parts. If you're not happy with an element, ditch it and try something new. Otherwise you'll be like one of those uncreative painters that tediously recreates photographs with paint. Whatever you liked about the original part will always be an influence, so it's not altogether lost.
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Old 08-12-2017, 09:39 AM   #8
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Holy crap!

Do whatever you want. Try it and see what you can make out of it. Maybe it'll be a horrible mess, maybe it'll be really cool but not really sound like a "real" drummer, but maybe it'll be something unique and personal and actually fit the recording better.

Please don't let these people talk you out of it as long as the rest of your band is on board, and you think any of you can give decent percussion performances. I had a similar plan to record with a band of mine, but the interpersonal dynamic with those guys would have made it into a shitshow real fast.
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