Old 03-15-2019, 04:12 AM   #1
read
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Default Slow release on compressor? whY?

so as far i understood release only really affects the "next waveform" most times as the volume has to fall below the threshold before release starts working

but that would most times means losing the transient of the next waveform (with a slow release)

so am i right to assume 90% of the time slow release does not work?
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Old 03-15-2019, 04:31 AM   #2
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also another question for the following video link, would the threshold line be where i showed it in picture below?
please see video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mrx2nxQYsnQ&t=220s

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Old 03-15-2019, 06:54 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by read View Post
also another question for the following video link, would the threshold line be where i showed it in picture below?
please see video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mrx2nxQYsnQ&t=220s

The threshold line in your picture is somewhere below the largest peak of the first input pulse, but above the level of the second pulse. (Here I am using 'pulse' to mean tone burst.)

Threshold means 'don't compress at all unless the signal is above this level. Start the attck time when threshold has been reached. Start the release time when the input falls below the threshold.' Since the output is obviously compressed, the threshold was exceeded immediately. The second pulse is below the threshold because the release time started.

In general, release time for a compressor is set (as you said) so the release is complete before the next note arrives. For a peak clipper/limiter it is set to zero. For a leveling amp it is set quite long, like a few seconds.
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Old 03-15-2019, 08:34 AM   #4
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so like this?

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Old 03-15-2019, 09:12 AM   #5
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Could be - the curve down at the start of the bigger pulse show the effect of the Attack time kicking in - the time it takes for the full compression to be applied.

The rest of the bigger pulse is compressed. When the small pulse starts the compression is slowly released (hence the release time). The curve upwards shows the release time kicking in - the time it takes for the compression to be reduced towards zero. If you compare the heights of the right-hand ends of the smaller pulse you will see that some compression is still occurring -so the threshold level is a bit lower than the small pulse's level.

If you do not want that lower pulse to be compressed at all try a very low release.

Try out some other compressors which give more info. This is MeldaProduction's (free) MCompressor):
Big pic >>> https://i.imgur.com/BR8yDX5.png

Also, have a look at:
https://www.soundonsound.com/techniq...sion-made-easy
https://www.soundonsound.com/techniq...sound-you-want
https://www.soundonsound.com/techniq...ix-compression
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Old 03-15-2019, 09:18 AM   #6
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You'll only lose the next transient if your ratio is high enough to be killing it.

Slow release + low ratio can be handy for levelling. For instance, in a metal track you might want to let short bursts of kick hits through at full volume but pull them down a bit for longer double-kick sections.

- Slow attack so that 3 hits, say, will come through without the compressor really reacting.

- Slow release so that it only lets off if the kicks stop for X ms.

- Low ratio so you're just turning down the volume by maybe a few dB.
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Old 03-15-2019, 10:31 AM   #7
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Yeah, what kills transients is when you quickly pull them down more than the sustain portion so that the actual shape of the blip (note, drum hit) changes drastically. In the case of a long realease, it's kind of more just turning the whole thing down without much changing the envelope.

@Lokasenna - I usually use long RMS times for that kind of thing and just leave attack and release at 0. You can mess with lookahead/precomp to get a sort of (pre)attack/release thing happening. It basically leaves things alone unless they get loud and stay loud, and works a lot like volume automation just turning whole things up and down without messing up their envelopes or really knocking down any transients.

I think very few people realize that a compressor is kind of always either attacking or releasing unless nothing ever gets to threshold so it never does anything. Unless you're actually compressing steady state signals like above, the input is always changing, so the appropriate amount of gain is always changing, so the compressor is always "attacking" toward that target, but almost never actually reaches gain reduction appropriate to the actual input except kind of by accident.

Last edited by ashcat_lt; 03-15-2019 at 10:39 AM.
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