Old 10-29-2018, 01:15 PM   #1
reapermusic
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Default recording through both audio interface inputs at once

Hi everyone,

I always record guitars separately.....left guitar on it's own track and Right guitar on it's own track using different amp/cab sims for both sides

I have acquired an amp cab modeling unit the Mooer Preamp Live and noticed it has two outputs.
I would like to connect both those outputs to both my inputs on my audio interface.....then simultaneously arm (2) MONO tracks in Reaper and record.
This way I can pan freely,EQ, add effects ect

Are there any advantages/disadvantages to doing it this way besides maybe lacking that human element physically playing both tracks separately?

I should also mention that I will have two different cabinet IR's loaded up for left and right

Is recording this way unfavorable?


I'm going to try it tonite but was wondering what you all think.
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Old 10-29-2018, 06:01 PM   #2
reapermusic
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Well, I tried it out a bunch of times but you just can't beat recording each track separately sounds so much better
I did some comparisons and I didn't like the results.
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Old 10-30-2018, 10:42 AM   #3
ashcat_lt
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There are good reasons to play single guitar (performance/track) through multiple amplifiers. All kinds of people do it all the time and some rely on it for their "signature" tones.

It's not even close to the same thing as recording multiple performances whether they're through different amps or not. We do that for different reasons.

There are in fact very good reasons to record each pass through multiple amps, combining both techniques.

It's completely up to you which is more appropriate for a given production.
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:45 PM   #4
vdubreeze
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For a few months many lifetimes ago I recorded several mics on several amps for what I'd assumed would be the monumental guitar sound of different destinations of the same guitar signal, combines and spread into a powerful, riveting listening experience. Because I finally could. Really fun to do and monitor. Sounded terrible in the mix. The attempt to make a sound that had so much of the wide potential of a guitar sound that there would only be the need for one guitar performance was negated by it also making anything else also having no place to be. Got it out of my system. Sometimes I'll still put several mics on more than one amp but then I pick the one I like the best and strike the rest, don't even record them. A second distant mic in the room means I'm feeling wild and crazy.

I like doubled parts but what I like even more are single tracks and power trios where the guitar solo means the rhythm guitar doesn't keep playing.
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:04 AM   #5
Dimaension X
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Anyone remember Van Halen I? For the most part that album was recorded live in the studio, guitar panned right, and the reverb of the guitar panned to the left. Really odd, but one of the best sounding guitar performances and recordings ever.

I also think they only used 1 or 2 close mics on Eddie's Marshall cab, and that's it.

I tend to double track guitars (two performances panned 90% left and right), but no more than that. More tracks just tends to clutter up the works. Less tracks mean you have more of the individual characteristics of that particular guitar track.

Using two separate amp sims/IRs on different settings will help fill out the sound, but just watch out for phase issues that can happen when you have the same audio clip copied onto separate tracks and panned. It's not the same as recording two separate performances, which will thicken up the sound due to the nuances of difference between the audio clips.
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